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Introducing The Historical Jesus

Introducing the Historical Jesus: is a eight-week class in small group format presenting an overview of the central story of the Bible, the person and purpose of Jesus, and God’s plan for the restoration of humanity. This class will read and discuss The Original Jesus by NT Wright. Join us as we explore Jesus, his historical context, the Gospels, and what it means to follow Jesus today. If you're new to the Christian experience, this will be an invaluable introduction to Jesus and the Gospels. This class is a way to get your bearings as you move forward in exploring your faith and the person of Jesus and his central role in the Gospels. This class will also provide an introduction to reading and understanding the Gospels. If you're a longtime Christian we think you'll find a refreshing and compelling new understanding of the person of Jesus, his historical context, his aims, intentions and ultimately his mission.

Required Class Book

If you purchase The Original Jesus through our amazon.com referral program, the church receives a 4% referral fee. So, this is an easy way to buy the book and give to the church.

 

In The Original Jesus Wright focuses on key stages in Jesus’ life and on key elements of his teaching. In the process, Wright presents a vivid reconstruction of what Jesus himself was aiming to achieve and how the movement he began can best be understood in relation to the turbulent politics and fervent aspirations of his day. Wright also looks at the way we interpret the different Gospel narratives about Jesus, showing how modern readers coming fresh to these texts can do so in an informed and discriminating way.

Based on rigorous historical research and featuring numerous full-color illustrations as well as short, clear chapters, The Original Jesus offers compelling insight into what Jesus really stood for, why he was crucified, and how it was that his followers came to regard him as nothing less than the human face of God.

 

 

Recommended Books (Not Required)

 

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Out of his own commitment to both historical scholarship and Christian ministry, Wright challenges us to roll up our sleeves and take seriously the study of the historical Jesus. He writes, "Many Christians have been, frankly, sloppy in their thinking and talking about Jesus, and hence, sadly, in their praying and in their practice of discipleship. We cannot assume that by saying the word Jesus, still less the word Christ, we are automatically in touch with the real Jesus who walked and talked in first-century Palestine. . . . Only by hard, historical work can we move toward a fuller comprehension of what the Gospels themselves were trying to say."

 

 

 

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Did the historical person Jesus really regard himself as the Son of God? What did Jesus actually stand for? And what are we to make of the early Christian conviction that, following his execution by the Romans, Jesus physically rose from the dead? Who Was Jesus? examines the recent Jesus publications in the context of the many modern Jesus books, dominated by Albert Schweitzer’s masterful portrait, The Quest of the Historical Jesus (1906). As Wright shows, the modern “quest” displays many variations on the same themes, so that the latest portraits of Jesus are not nearly as novel as they are made out to be.

 

 

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Two friends and colleagues, sitting at opposite ends of the theological table, examine The Meaning of Jesus in this readable and thoughtful book. Using a point-counterpoint format, Marcus Borg (liberal) and N.T. Wright (traditional) respectfully discuss their divergent views on the virgin birth, the resurrection, Christ's divinity, his teachings, and other topics that relate to your faith today! A must-read for any Christian looking for answers about the historical Jesus.

 

 

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Was Jesus the Miracle Worker that generations have believed him to be? Or was he merely a master psychologist, a purveyor of paranormal therapy? And what should we make of his stilling the storm or feeding the five thousand? In this comprehensive textbook study, Graham Twelftree evaluates Jesus' own understanding of the miracles he performed, the historical reliability of the stories, and the way the modern mind views Christ's miracles. Fascinating!

 

 

 

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Christianity is a story about God and the remarkable lengths he goes to in order to rescue lost and hurting people. The Story gives you just that—the story of Scripture. Condensed into 30 accessible chapters, it reads more like a novel than your typical religious text. And like any good story, The Story is filled with intrigue, drama, conflict, romance, and redemption.

 

 

 

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Here is the story of the Bible from beginning to end as you've never read it before, retold with exciting detail and passionate energy by master storyteller Walter Wangerin Jr. The Book of God reads like a fine novel, dramatizing the sweep of biblical events, making the men and women of this ancient book come alive in vivid detail and dialogue. From Abraham wandering in the desert to Jesus teaching the multitudes on a Judean hillside, this award-winning best-seller follows the biblical story in chronological order. Priests and kings, apostles and prophets, common folk and charismatic leaders -- individual stories offer glimpses into an unfolding revelation that reaches across the centuries to touch us today.

 

 

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Organized around thirteen key moments in the history of Christianity, this popular introduction to church history provides contemporary Christians with a fuller understanding of God as he has revealed his purpose through the centuries. A study section has been added that includes questions and application challenges for today makes Turning Points, 2d ed. all the more useful for church study groups and students of church history.

In this popular introduction to church history, Mark Noll isolates twelve key events that provide a framework for understanding the history of Christianity.

 
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